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http://www.autoblog.com/2009/11/17/psa-nissan-doubles-warranty-on-cvts-to-10-years-120-000-miles/

Autoblog said:
Anyone who's had a transmission fixed knows it can cost thousands of dollars for both the unit and the labor. And the cost of repair of a CVT transmission can outpace that of a more conventional transmission with four to six forward speeds as most repairs require that the transmission is replaced. Thankfully, Nissan has been listening to its customers, and as a result, the Japanese automaker is doubling the length of its warranty from five years and 60,000 miles to ten years and 120,000 miles.

That's all well and good for Nissan CVT owners who have yet to experience an issue, but what about Nissan CVT owners who have already shelled out thousands for repairs? Good news, Nissan is going to reimburse you for your pricey fix. If you've already paid for a CVT repair, you'll need to fill out Nissan's Reimbursement Form (downloadable from Nissan's letter to customers) and follow the instructions. Nissan is also looking after customers who have to repair their CVT transmissions outside of warranty, working with suppliers and dealers to lower the cost of replacement transmissions and repairs.
 

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Awesome. Thanks for the notification.

I've been extremely happy with the CVT in daily use. The technology has been employed in scooters for over half a century but it's been relatively recent that its moved to higher power applications because of better belt construction and computer control technology.

Here's a couple replies on that blog page that I found interesting:

"I actually work at a large Nissan dealer and spoke to my rep at national about this.

The failure rate of these CVT transmissions is actually less than 1% - I don't know the failure rate of their automatics, but he did say that that number was higher than 1%.

From what he told me Nissan has actually been getting wind of people who have had expensive repairs making a stink online, and they wanted to head off any issues/bad blood ahead of time. The CVT's have had a great track record, but they didn't want people to have a bad perception of the product.

They are confident enough that they extended the warranty - great for me, I would rather take Nissans money than have to tell some single mother she needs to pay out of pocket for a $5k+ transmission repair."


and:


"I used to work at a Nissan dealer and our master tech told me he never had cars come in with CVT problems. They are a very reliable transmission especially when looking at higher mileage cars when a typical automatic tranny will have the usual slipping this will not happen in a high mileage CVT vehicle..."
 

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Talking with people about the car they get hesitant about the new technology and fear it. Thus loss of sale's for Nissan, so this is a way to boost confidence in their product. With the Cube so new and the Versa rated by consumer reports as one of the least reliable vehicles on the market, this seems like a good move.

Like above, good for us :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ChristineK said:
Talking with people about the car they get hesitant about the new technology and fear it. Thus loss of sale's for Nissan, so this is a way to boost confidence in their product. With the Cube so new and the Versa rated by consumer reports as one of the least reliable vehicles on the market, this seems like a good move.

Like above, good for us :yes:
True, the Versa maybe rated as such by Consumer reports, but the CVT is available on the most popular Nissan models including the Sentra, Altima, Maxima, Rogue, and Murano. I believe most, if not all, of the aforementioned models have been rated at least recommended by Consumer Reports.
 

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Awesome. Thanks for the notification.

I've been extremely happy with the CVT in daily use. The technology has been employed in scooters for over half a century but it's been relatively recent that its moved to higher power applications because of better belt construction and computer control technology.

Here's a couple replies on that blog page that I found interesting:

"I actually work at a large Nissan dealer and spoke to my rep at national about this.

The failure rate of these CVT transmissions is actually less than 1% - I don't know the failure rate of their automatics, but he did say that that number was higher than 1%.

From what he told me Nissan has actually been getting wind of people who have had expensive repairs making a stink online, and they wanted to head off any issues/bad blood ahead of time. The CVT's have had a great track record, but they didn't want people to have a bad perception of the product.

They are confident enough that they extended the warranty - great for me, I would rather take Nissans money than have to tell some single mother she needs to pay out of pocket for a $5k+ transmission repair."


and:


"I used to work at a Nissan dealer and our master tech told me he never had cars come in with CVT problems. They are a very reliable transmission especially when looking at higher mileage cars when a typical automatic tranny will have the usual slipping this will not happen in a high mileage CVT vehicle..."
I think the big issue, at least to me, is the cost of replacement for the CVT transmission. Normal AT repairs or replacement is at least double that of other AT types. I bought a Nissan Cube with 109,000 miles, 8 months later without warning I couldn't even get out of my driveway. It went into shutdown or safety mode, which is anything but safe. Glad I wasn't out on the highway when it decided to throw a hissy fit. The idea of a CVT type transmission sounds like a great idea. From a mechanical sense the efficiency of a CVT should result in improved gas mileage and not having shift points is appreciated. Smoother acceleration is an added plus. I have found that there are interconnected sensors and electronics that can cause the CVT to stop working and go into safety mode. Apparently nobody outside of a NISSAN dealership knows very much about working on them. I took mine to a very reputable AT shop and he's pretty much baffled by the electronics. The only reason I'm weighing in here is in hopes that someone considering buying a NISSAN with a CVT might be forewarned that if the CVT in the car they buy stops working they can be looking at $5000 to get it back on the road. So, like in my situation I paid $5000 for the CUBE and I may have to fork out the purchase price, again, in order to get back on the road.
 
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