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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!

Mike here from NonStopTuning :)

I just wanted to stop by and see if any of the members here have tried the NST CR-Lite Crank Pulley. We would love to hear some of your feedback, user reviews, thoughts, and comments regarding your experiences with our product.

We are looking to sponsor one of the online Cube communities, based on the amount of interest and support for our product from the community, and yours is currently one of the forums on our list.

Many thanks in advance to all the forum members and the staff for making this a great resource for all the Cube tuners out there.

NST CR-Lite Crank Pulley for the Nissan Cube...
http://www.nonstoptuning.com/pKitNisCube.html



Thanks again everyone, good luck and have fun with all your projects!


MIKE @ NST
www.NonStopTuning.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the interest and the question, I appreciate it!

At this time, we offer our CR-Lite Crank Pulley. This is an OEM sized crank pulley, but is roughly 70% lighter than the OEM Nissan pulley. The excellent weight reduction leads to quicker throttle response, better hp & tq delivery at the wheels, quicker acceleration, and better fuel economy. The OEM size allows the tuner to retain the OEM belt and runs all the accessories at OEM speeds. This is something that most of our customers really love about the CR-Lite option.

We have designed pulleys for many Honda, Nissan, Toyota, Scion, VW, etc. over the past few years and our CR-Lite Crank Pulleys have always been very popular items for us.

Thanks again, good luck and have fun with all your projects!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
1HoTCuBe said:
Hmm anything to save some mpg would be a big plus! Have you installed this on any cubes?
We have sold about a dozen of these pulleys to Nissan Versa and Cube owners over the past couple months. We have also sold very similar pieces to Toyota Yaris, Scion xA/xB, and Scion tC owners. Some of their feedback can be found in the following threads...

http://www.microimageonline.com/for...owners/47-nissan-versa-cube-crank-pulley.html

http://www.yarisworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4737

http://www.scionlife.com/forums/showthread.php?t=154930

Hopefully we can get some feedback from some Cube owners here on your forums!

Thanks again, good luck and have fun with all your projects!!!
 

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I installed an Agency Power lightweight OE size crank pulley on my car and it was very beneficial during acceleration. The downside is your engine noise increases, but whether that matters depends on what you're looking for. The problem with undersized pulleys is that not only do you have to run a different belt, but you also have less power available from your alternator and everything else driven off you serpentine. Personally, I think undersized makes good sense for a track car, but for street driving, it's questionable.

My point is that changing to an OE sized lightweight pulley has advantages; however, whether you wish to do so is up to you :)!

PS. Don't expect an MPG improvement, this is about engine responsiveness.
 

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:) i order my pulley for the cube today with Mike, we should be receiving it monday
so as soon as i get it a DIY will come for sure
i think the nst pulley will be a very reliable product since is much lighter than the oem but still able to use the same oem belt.

thanks so much to Mike and nst they have great service ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
We received the following questions via Email this weekend...

> I plan to buy a lightweight crank pulley for my Nissan Versa 2009.
> I would like to know if it is going to affect the dynamic ballancing of the
> engine?
> Is it easy to install?
> How many RWHP should I gain?
> Thank you.
I will share my responses here with all of you...


Thank you for your interest in our site and products, we appreciate it.

1. Our CR-Lite Crank Pulley will not negatively affect the balance of your
engine. Your engine is internally balanced and lightening the load with our
CR-Lite Crank Pulley will not cause your engine any harm.

You can read about weight reduction, internal balancing, harmonics, vibrations,
etc in the following threads. You will also read reviews from people who have
actually used NST pulleys in the real world. You will find NO negative user
reviews regarding our product...

http://www.8thcivic.com/forums/bolt...hensive-thread-nst-nonstoptuning-pulleys.html

http://www.yarisworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4737

http://www.scionlife.com/forums/showthread.php?t=154930


2. Installation is not very difficult and requires roughly one hour with the
proper tools.


3. You can expect to gain roughly 5whp and 5wtq across the entire RPM band.
The NST CR-Lite Crank Pulley is one of the most noticeable and best
bang-per-buck modification you can do for your Versa.


Thanks again, good luck and have fun with all your projects!
 

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my pulley arrived monday and just install it a couple hours ago.
this is a great mod for the price it costs
you will notice the diference rite away when you drive the cube after installation
faster acceleration, quiker response to the pedal
this mod for sure puts the cube on the pocket rocket potential lol! ;)

thanks again mike
 

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These pulley's look nice, but I see the factory pulley isn't simply a pulley but also a "Harmonic Balancer". How does the NST address crankshat harmonics? - Dan
 

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If it's like most other cars on the roads today (pretty much a guarantee), it's not actually an harmonic balancer (that's merely the traditional parlance going back many decades), it's an NVH pulley. An associated consideration is that for the short length of an inline four crank, appreciable harmonics are very high and beyond the normal rpm range of our engines. Beyond that, of course, the rotating assembly is internally balanced.

I spent many many hours researching this topic before my own lightweight pulley purchase a couple years ago -- I've no more interest in taking silly risks with my engine than you do :).

PS. NVH stands for Noise/Vibration/Harshness. The purpose of an NVH pulley is to minimize engine noise and vibration in the cabin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Square1 said:
These pulley's look nice, but I see the factory pulley isn't simply a pulley but also a "Harmonic Balancer". How does the NST address crankshat harmonics? - Dan
Thank you for the question Dan,

As I have stated before, the NST pulley will not have any negative effects on your engine. Please feel free to look through some of the links I provided above. You will find THOUSANDS of user reviews from other tuners who have used our products on other very similar engines and platforms. You will find NO cases of engine failure, or any other problems, when NST pulleys have been used.


Furthermore...


This one deserves an entire book, but here goes...

Q. Will NST Pulleys lead to premature engine failure?

I cover this topic at least several times a month but I don't mind, I understand that your cars are a very large investment for all of you and I prefer that you be intelligent and informed about all your modifications. So here we go again... Please take a few minutes to read everything I have posted here, as I worked hard on trying to give you a good explanation on the topic...

In the past many engines were externally balanced. There was an external balancer attached to the outside of the engine, on the crank snout, used to balance the engine externally. The crank pulley in such engines would then be attached to this balancer. Removal of this balancer is a bad idea. These balancers were most often used on large (6 to V shaped engines of the domestic muscle car era.

Take a look at any modern (1980s and beyond) Honda, Toyota, Nissan, or other japanese inline 4 and you will find no such balancer. These engines are all internally balanced, and this process has improved even further since the late 1990s. So the topic of a BALANCER does not apply here.

What you will find on many modern engines is a harmonic damper. This is a small rubber band, litterally less than 2mm, less than 1/8th of an inch, thick that is built into the crank pulley. OEM crank pulleys are often called DAMPERS. Try placing an order for a crank pulley at your dealer and your invoice will read damper. This rubber is used to absorb something called NVH, noise/vibration/harshness. Suffice it to say, this rubber is actually not very good at performing its intended purpose after as little as a few thousand miles. What happens to rubber after a couple years of humidity, weather, snow, rain, etc? It often becomes brittle, hard, and crunchy. Can something with these properties actually absorb vibrations very well?

Many many NST customers, including people on your own forums, have reported smoother running engines with NST pulleys. Especially at idle. How is this possible if the rubber is such a vital and super important piece??? Perhaps the rubber is not as important as it is cracked up to be???


Furthermore....


On the topic of the rubber damper, engine vibrations, or possible threats resulting from elimination of this rubber piece...

On a relatively understressed near stock motor with bolt ons or low amounts of boost like what most of the people on this forum probably run, a solid pulley will not have any life threatening consiquences. The factory pulley with a 2mm (less than a 1/8th inch) damper is primarily there for wide band NVH (noise vibration harshness) supression from the engine and driveline. Removing the damper and replacing it with a solid pulley may lead to minor addtional NVH but will not harm the engine. In fact, most people claim their engines seem to run smoother with NST pulleys.

The engineering reasons are that most modern engines have a short, strong crank with, a relatively high natural frequency. The dangerous second harmonic that can cause damage occurs at an rpm that this sort of engine will never see, in the area above 10,000 rpm. Even the stock damper is not tuned for attinuation at this sort of rpm so the argument is somewhat of a moot point.

Now weak engines that are pushing the limit with LOTS of revs, wimpy cranks, super long strokes, lots of boost and dwelling in the upper rpm ranges for long periods of time can benefit from a damper designed to deal with this sort of operation but our engine is not like this, and probably very few people with this motor on this forum push the envelope that hard. How many 1.8 Liter, 500HP, 12,000RPM Cube motors do we have on these forums?

As far as I can tell, our engine has a strong and stiff bottom end that is well built for our intended use. It has an internaly balanced crankshaft which is less like to break due to torsional vibration.

There are a lot of Honda, Toyota, and Nissan guys who use underdrive crank pulleys in road racing series like NASA or SCCA. Road racing is much more punishing on an engine than other motorsports. The engine is subjected to run times lasting roughly 30 minutes with the engine always in the upper ranges of its rpm limit. One race weekend is the equivlent of hundreds of 1/4 mile passes. These guys would not use NST pulleys if they were not reliable.

NST sponsors the first ever wheel to wheel Scion tC NASA Road Race car. The same car is also very competitive in the Grand Am series and has factory backing from Toyota, Scion, and TRD. This car has been using pulleys from NST with great results since day one.

NST has sponsored several drift cars participating in the professional US drift series D1GP USA and Fromula Drift. Several of our cars have also competed in the NOPI Drift series. To make things better, NST products are also used in autocross, time attack, and drag cars. These cars have been using NST pulleys with no issues of any kind for the past few seasons.

We could go on and on...

Is a solid crank pulley harmless to all engines? No it is not. As I said... small, super high reving engines, when modified way past the simple bolt on stages may have problems. These engines reach critcal harmonics, past the 10,000 rpm range, an rpm only reached by certain RACE engines.

A mildly modded inline six will most likely be fine but one subjected to high rpm for long periods of time (90% of its life) with lots of boost will probably suffer. In this case , the stock balancer/damper is probably not adequate either.

Some of the older american V8 engines are externaly balanced and it is critical not to use a solid hub pulley not designed for these applications, or damage to the engine could result. You will not find solid NST pulleys on our website for such engines.

Our engines and most around here do not fall into the above catagories. Rest assured that your engines will not blow up and die or have a reduced life in street and even racing use with these parts.

I would bet that every "expert" that tells you otherwise has little personal, practical, real world experience with the subject; as it applies in your case.

Again, I understand that your cars are a very large investment and that you depend on them as your daily means of transportation, so I do not take your questions personally. Please do a search of the links I provided for you to see what others have to say regarding our product and performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
TrevorS said:
If it's like most other cars on the roads today (pretty much a guarantee), it's not actually an harmonic balancer (that's merely the traditional parlance going back many decades), it's an NVH pulley. An associated consideration is that for the short length of an inline four crank, appreciable harmonics are very high and beyond the normal rpm range of our engines. Beyond that, of course, the rotating asembly is internally balanced.

I spent many many hours researching this topic before my own lightweight pulley purchase a couple years ago -- I've no more interest in taking silly risks with my engine than you do :).

PS. NVH stands for Noise/Vibration/Harshness. The purpose of these pulleys is to minimize engine noise and vibration in the cabin.

That's correct Trevor,

Using the NST Crank Pulley will NOT harm your engine or cause any negative side effects.

Thank you for chiming in with your thoughts. Good luck and have fun with all your projects!
 

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I appreciate your response and understand what you're saying. I can't say much about the Nissan engines and the effects of a solid pulley Vs one with the rubber as on the stock pulley. But in another make that I've had many years of experience with, also a 4 cylinder similar to the Nissan engine in the cube, many of these engines experienced premature front main seal leaking using a solid pulley (not your pulley), but other popular brands. There were also several cases where we noticed after time, the solid aluminum pulley's would actually wear themselves onto the gear it’s supposed to sit flush against causing the aluminum pulley to walk inward on the crankshaft. When the aluminum pulley’s were removed there was actually about a 1/32” impression where the harder steel gear had actually worn into the aluminum pulley. Although we didn’t experience any crankshaft breakage or anything that severe, the premature front seal leaks as well as the steel gear wearing itself into the aluminum pulley has since become a cause of concern for me. In every one of these cases the pulley's were properly installed and the bolt torqued to specs. The one's where the gear had worn into the pulley of course were out of torque specs when it was discovered, because of the pulley's movement. After we discovered the first one by accident due to a routine timing belt replacement, we decided to check others and found it was more the rule than the exception. At that point we all removed our aluminum pulley's and returned to stock units. I really do like the concept of a lighter pulley for quicker rev's, but not if it will create problems. -Thanks, Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Square1 said:
I appreciate your response and understand what you're saying. I can't say much about the Nissan engines and the effects of a solid pulley Vs one with the rubber as on the stock pulley. But in another make that I've had many years of experience with, also a 4 cylinder similar to the Nissan engine in the cube, many of these engines experienced premature front main seal leaking using a solid pulley (not your pulley), but other popular brands. There were also several cases where we noticed after time, the solid aluminum pulley's would actually wear themselves onto the gear it’s supposed to sit flush against causing the aluminum pulley to walk inward on the crankshaft. When the aluminum pulley’s were removed there was actually about a 1/32” impression where the harder steel gear had actually worn into the aluminum pulley. Although we didn’t experience any crankshaft breakage or anything that severe, the premature front seal leaks as well as the steel gear wearing itself into the aluminum pulley has since become a cause of concern for me. In every one of these cases the pulley's were properly installed and the bolt torqued to specs. The one's where the gear had worn into the pulley of course were out of torque specs when it was discovered, because of the pulley's movement. After we discovered the first one by accident due to a routine timing belt replacement, we decided to check others and found it was more the rule than the exception. At that point we all removed our aluminum pulley's and returned to stock units. I really do like the concept of a lighter pulley for quicker rev's, but not if it will create problems. -Thanks, Dan
I understand these concerns and have also heard about such issues... though NEVER with an NST pulley.

All NST pulleys are HARD ANODIZED to help make them the strongest pulleys available on the market. Very very few manufacturers actually offer hard anodized pulleys... most other brands are either bare aluminum or soft cosmetic anodized.

Again, I understand your concerns, but as I have stated several times... Please take just a few minutes to read through some of the links I have provided for you and you will see that the THOUSANDS of customers who have posted with regards to our products for Honda, Nissan, Toyota, Scion, etc etc have never experienced any issues of any kind when using NST pulleys. Again, zero issues of any kind.

Not all pulleys are created equal, and not all pulleys are NST. The thousands of 99.99% positive reviews from our customers should speak volumes in this regard.
 

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Again, Thanks :)
 

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FWIW -- If the lightweight pulley is designed correctly, there should be no seal leakage and no motion on the shaft (the fit with the shaft and the key should be firm, but installable by hand pressure only -- just like the OE pulley). There were some early lightweight pulleys for the original Scions that caused seal leaks. There was great concern among users it could be due to tortional harmonics damaging the front crank bearing. When the problem was closely examined, it was found the seals were damaged by a dimension error in the pulley resulting in excessive pressure on the seals, despite correct bolt torque. There was, in fact, no damage to the bearings themselves. The manufacturer corrected the pulley design and since then, there have been no further leakage issues.

PS. If the engine were to be adapted for racing and modified for serious track performance (engine build with lightweight flywheel and higher redline, etc), then there are other pulley designs that would probably be better suited. But for our street machines, a lightweight is fine. The key is to get one that's well designed -- you don't want to throw out the balance of the rotating assembly, you don't want to lose concentricity of the belt drive surface, and you don't want the risk of breakage. In other words, all lightweight pulley's are not necessarily created equal. Check the pedigree before purchase.
 

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i understand your point
depending on your needs is hwat you wanna hunt for
here let me give you a quik example where i think it shows exactly what i think we all trying to understand
this mod hapn on my audi tt
i change the oem pulley for a n------ed completely focused on performance results
i didnt care nothing else but make that car faster and faster


big diference as you notice
far smaller and lighter than the oem, the oem felt like a brick compared with the tiny pulley
yes we got amazing results and even the blow off valve was louder than ever
BUT hot days arrived in los angeles and the audi was due for oil change, here is where the bad times started
the car will burn more oil making it hot and soon enough i felt like i was driving and old car with a constant leak where i had to check the oil level on a daily basis
also i got a lot of overheating problems once i got into a bumper to bumper traffic, either i had to get off the freeway or the temp gauge will go nuts
and to finish...my last problem was ac related too, every time the car made a full stop or stop on a red light the ac will not shoot cold air anymore making the situation even more uglier
month later after been so sick of dealing with the problem i decided to take off the pulley and put back the oem....well results were very natural
the tt lost that extra hip of hp but i got back my cold air on the ac and the overheating issues went bye bye
that pulley was way to small for the every day person making it almost for racing purposes
that why when i saw NST came out with a pulley for the cube i didnt had a doubt that it will work just fine because i heard about their products before back when i used to have a yaris.
 

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TrevorS said:
FWIW -- If the lightweight pulley is designed correctly, there should be no seal leakage and no motion on the shaft (the fit with the shaft and the key should be firm, but installable by hand pressure only -- just like the OE pulley). There were some early lightweight pulleys for the original Scions that caused seal leaks. There was great concern among users it could be due to tortional harmonics damaging the front crank bearing. When the problem was closely examined, it was found the seals were damaged by a dimension error in the pulley resulting in excessive pressure on the seals, despite correct bolt torque. There was, in fact, no damage to the bearings themselves. The manufacturer corrected the pulley design and since then, there have been no further leakage issues.

PS. If the engine were to be adapted for racing and modified for serious track performance (engine build with lightweight flywheel and higher redline, etc), then there are other pulley designs that would probably be better suited. But for our street machines, a lightweight is fine. The key is to get one that's well designed -- you don't want to throw out the balance of the rotating assembly, you don't want to lose concentricity of the belt drive surface, and you dont want the risk of breakage. In other words, all lightweight pulley's are not necessarily created equal. Check the pedigree before purchase.
Trevor,

I’ve been building and modifying engines and racing for over 40 years and know how the pulley’s are supposed to fit etc. It isn’t the fit that has me concerned, that’s why I asked about harmonics. It’s this tiny vibration that we suspect caused the oil leaking on the front main seals of the engines I spoke of. When the pulley’s were removed the seals looked to be in perfect condition. We mic’ed the pulley’s, both the after market as well as the stock and both were identical. We cleaned off the oil and reinstalled the stock pulley’s without replacing the seal just to see what would happen. On both engines we did this to the oil leak stopped. Like I said, these were on a different motor all together than the Nissan’s and I have no experience with the Nissan 4 bangers. It could have simply been something isolated to the particular engines in question, only time will tell on the cube motor. But to NST’s defense, I will admit. I’ve been reading about other cars using their pulley’s including the twin to the cube the Versa and so far I haven’t read of similar issues using any light weight pulley. But then again. These are relatively new and haven’t logged a lot of hours or miles yet. Only time will tell. I hope for the best as I would like to run one on my cube. I’m anxious to follow your car as the test bed…LOL - Dan
 

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damian666robin said:
i understand your point
depending on your needs is hwat you wanna hunt for
i decided to take off the pulley and put back the oem....well results were very natural
the tt lost that extra hip of hp but i got back my cold air on the ac and the overheating issues went bye bye
that pulley was way to small for the every day person making it almost for racing purposes
that why when i saw NST came out with a pulley for the cube i didnt had a doubt that it will work just fine because i heard about their products before back when i used to have a yaris.
Personally, I'm entirely satisfied that underdrive pulleys (like the one in your photo) are a mistake for street cars. As you suggest, they make sense for the track, but that's it. Still, many people are using UD pulleys on their DD cars, however, I would personally never support that mod.
 
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